Home| Letters| Links| RSS| About Us| Contact Us

On the Frontline

What's New

Table of Contents

Index of Authors

Index of Titles

Index of Letters

Mailing List


subscribe to our mailing list:



SECTIONS

Critique of Intelligent Design

Evolution vs. Creationism

The Art of ID Stuntmen

Faith vs Reason

Anthropic Principle

Autopsy of the Bible code

Science and Religion

Historical Notes

Counter-Apologetics

Serious Notions with a Smile

Miscellaneous

Letter Serial Correlation

Mark Perakh's Web Site

Discussion

You can read and reply to the existing discussion threads related to the article, or create a new thread:

Your name *:
Your email *:
Security question *: 5 + 19 =
Related article(s):
Subject *:
Message *:
     Length: (max.: 3000 characters)

 

Title Author Date
clarification e.j.levin@stir.ac.uk Nov 12, 2004
I was very surprised to read the text (pasted below) on your website http://www.talkreason.org/articles/Morality.cfm

For the avoidance of doubt, I would be grateful if you would provide me with the references to Talmudic sources that prohibit Jews from saving the lives of endangered gentiles, that oblige the Jews to maltreat gentiles in commercial transactions, that make it permissible and even obligatory to deceive gentiles in certain cases, that permit Jews to appropriate the money and property borrowed from a gentile in the case of the latter's death, that forbid Jews to return objects lost by a gentile.

Thank you

Eric Levin


"Today these communities are permitted to save the lives of sick gentiles, to return the objects lost by gentiles, and to conduct honest business dealings with gentiles. As we know, classical Jewish sources beginning with the Talmud categorically rejected the very idea of equality between Jews and gentiles. For example, these sources impose an automatic death sentence on anyone they define as an idolater; in most cases they prohibit Jews from saving the lives of endangered gentiles, oblige the Jews to maltreat gentiles in commercial transactions, make it permissible and even obligatory to deceive gentiles in certain cases, and so on. Among other things, these sources (hereinafter referred to as "Halachah" for the sake of brevity) permit Jews to appropriate the money and property borrowed from a gentile in the case of the latter's death, and even to lie to his heirs regarding their financial relations with the deceased; forbid Jews to return objects lost by a gentile, and permit Jews to exploit a miscalculation made by a gentile, provided the mistake benefits the Jew."